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love poem sonnets

May 21, 2006

Sonnet 43

Sonnet 43, by William Shakespeare.
When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see,
For all the day they view things unrespected;
But when I sleep, in dreams they look on thee,
And darkly bright are bright in dark directed.
Then thou, whose shadow shadows doth make bright,
How would thy shadow's form form happy show
To the clear day with thy much clearer light,
When to unseeing eyes thy shade shines so!
How would, I say, mine eyes be blessed made
By looking on thee in the living day,
When in dead night thy fair imperfect shade
Through heavy sleep on sightless eyes doth stay!
All days are nights to see till I see thee,
And nights bright days when dreams do show thee me.
 

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Shakespeare's Sonnet 43

Posted on May 21, 2006 02:29 PM by Love P72.
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February 12, 2006

Sonnet 94

Sonnet 94, by William Shakespeare.
They that have power to hurt and will do none,
That do not do the thing they most do show,
Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow,
They rightly do inherit heaven's graces
And husband nature's riches from expense;
They are the lords and owners of their faces,
Others but stewards of their excellence.
The summer's flower is to the summer sweet,
Though to itself it only live and die,
But if that flower with base infection meet,
The basest weed outbraves his dignity:
For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. 

 

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SparkNotes: Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 94

Posted on February 12, 2006 06:38 PM by Love P72.
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May 30, 2005

But Be Contented When That Fell Arrest

But Be Contented When That Fell Arrest, by William Shakespeare.
But be contented when that fell arrest
Without all bail shall carry me away.
My life hath in this line some interest,
Which for memorial still with thee shall stay.
When thou reviewest this, thou dost review
The very part was consecrate to thee.
The earth can have but earth, which is his due;
My spirit is thine, the better part of me.
So then thou hast but lost the dregs of life,
The prey of worms, my body being dead,
The coward conquest of a wretch's knife,
Too base of thee to be remembered.
The worth of that is that which it contains,
And that is this, and this with thee remains.
 

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The Place 2 Be: Shakespeare's Sonnets

Posted on May 30, 2005 12:06 PM by Love P72.
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May 10, 2005

No Longer Mourn For Me When I Am Dead

No Longer Mourn For Me When I Am Dead, by William Shakespeare.
No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Give warning to the world that I am fled
From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell:
Nay, if you read this line, remember not
The hand that writ it, for I love you so,
That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,
If thinking on me then should make you woe.
O! if, -I say you look upon this verse,
When I perhaps compounded am with clay,
Do not so much as my poor name rehearse;
But let your love even with my life decay;
Lest the wise world should look into your moan,
And mock you with me after I am gone.
 

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Sonnets Sonnets 71-80

Posted on May 10, 2005 09:51 AM by Love P72.
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May 08, 2005

Those Pretty Wrongs That Liberty Commits

Those Pretty Wrongs That Liberty Commits, by William Shakespeare.
Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits,
When I am sometime absent from thy heart,
Thy beauty, and thy years full well befits,
For still temptation follows where thou art.
Gentle thou art, and therefore to be won,
Beauteous thou art, therefore to be assail'd;
And when a woman woos, what woman's son
Will sourly leave her till he have prevail'd?
Ay me! but yet thou might'st my seat forbear,
And chide thy beauty and thy straying youth,
Who lead thee in their riot even there
Where thou art forced to break a twofold truth:
Hers by thy beauty tempting her to thee,
Thine by thy beauty being false to me.
 

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Shakespeare's sonnets. The amazing sonnets. The text I - L.

Posted on May 8, 2005 02:27 PM by Love P72.
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April 21, 2005

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways, by Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, --- I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! --- and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
 

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"How do I love thee? Let me count the ways...," by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Posted on April 21, 2005 04:33 PM by Love P72.
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April 18, 2005

One Day I Wrote Her Name

One Day I Wrote Her Name, by Edmund Spenser.
One day I wrote her name upon the strand,
But came the waves and washed it away:
Again I wrote it with a second hand,
But came the tide and made my pains his prey.
"Vain man," said she, "that dost in vain essay
A mortal thing so to immortalize;
For I myself shall like to this decay,
And eke my name be wiped out likewise."
"Not so," quoth I; "let baser things devise
To lie in dust, but you shall live by fame;
My verse your virtues rare shall eternize,
And in the heavens write you glorious name:
Where, whenas Death shall all the world subdue,
Our love shall live, and later life renew."
 

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Love: One Day I Wrote Her Name

Posted on April 18, 2005 12:32 PM by Love P72.
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April 09, 2005

For Shame! Deny that Thou Bear'st Love to Any

For Shame! Deny that Thou Bear'st Love to Any, by William Shakespeare
For shame! deny that thou bear'st love to any,
Who for thyself art so unprovident.
Grant, if thou wilt, thou art beloved of many,
But that thou none lovest is most evident;
For thou art so possess'd with murderous hate
That 'gainst thyself thou stick'st not to conspire.
Seeking that beauteous roof to ruinate
Which to repair should be thy chief desire.
O, change thy thought, that I may change my mind!
Shall hate be fairer lodged than gentle love?
Be, as thy presence is, gracious and kind,
Or to thyself at least kind-hearted prove:
Make thee another self, for love of me,
That beauty still may live in thine or thee.
 

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Shakespeare's Sonnet 10

Posted on April 9, 2005 11:10 AM by Love P72.
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April 08, 2005

Let Me Not To The Marriage Of True Minds

Let Me Not To The Marriage Of True Minds, by William Shakespeare.
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
Oh, no! it is an ever-fix'd mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come'
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.
 

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Poetry - William Shakespeare - Let me not to the marriage of true minds - Admit impediments. Love is not love

Posted on April 8, 2005 01:25 AM by Love P72.
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April 06, 2005

What Is Beauty?

What is Beauty, from "Tamburlaine, The Great", by Christopher Marlowe.
What is beauty, saith my sufferings, then?
If all the pens that ever poets held
Had fed the feeling of their masters' thoughts,
And every sweetness that inspir'd their hearts,
Their minds, and muses on admired themes;
If all the heavenly quintessence they still
From their immortal flowers of poesy,
Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive
The highest reaches of a human wit;
If these had made one poem's period,
And all combin'd in beauty's worthiness,
Yet should their hover in their restless heads
One thought, one grace, one wonder, at the least,
Which into words no virtue can digest.

 

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Tamburlaine the Great: Monologue

Posted on April 6, 2005 08:14 PM by Love P72.
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April 05, 2005

Thou Blind Man's Mark, Thou Fool's Self-Chosen Snare

Thou Blind Man's Mark, Thou Fool's Self-Chosen Snare, by Sir Philip Sidney.
Thou blind man's mark, thou fool's self-chosen snare,
Fond fancy's scum, and dregs of scattered thought;
Band of all evils, cradle of causeless care;
Thou web of will, whose end is never wrought:
Desire, Desire! I have too dearly bought,
With price of mangled mind, thy worthless ware;
Too long, too long, asleep thou hast me brought,
Who shouldst my mind to higher things prepare,
But yet in vain thou hast my ruin sought,
In vain thou mad'st me to vain things aspire,
In vain thou kindlest all thy smoky fire,
For Virtue hath this better lesson taught:
Within myself to seek my only hire,
Desiring nought but how to kill Desire.
 

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Sir Philip Sidney

Posted on April 5, 2005 07:37 PM by Love P72.
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March 30, 2005

To One Who Has been Long In City Pent

To One Who Has been Long In City Pent, by John Keats.
To one who has been long in city pent
'Tis very sweet to look into the fair
And open face of heaven, -to breathe a prayer
Full in the smile of the blue firmament.
Who is more happy, when, with heart's content,
Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair
Of wavy grass, and reads a debonair
And gentle tale of love and languishment?
Returning home at evening, with an ear
Catching the notes of Philomel, -an eye
Watching the sailing cloudlet's bright career,
He mourns that day so soon has glided by,
E'en like the passage of an angel's tear
That falls through the clear ether silently.
 

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To One Who Has Been Long in City Pent by John Keats - Read Print

Posted on March 30, 2005 12:43 PM by Love P72.
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March 26, 2005

Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast As Thou Art

Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast As Thou Art, by John Keats
Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art-
   Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night,
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
   Like nature's patient sleepless eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
   Of pure ablution round earth's human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
   Of snow upon the mountains and the moors;
No-yet still steadfast, still unchangeable,
   Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
   Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever-or else swoon to death.
 

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Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art - by John Keats

Posted on March 26, 2005 06:06 PM by Love P72.
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March 19, 2005

Sonnet #61

Sonnet #61, by William Shakespeare.
Is it thy will, thy image should keep open
My heavy eyelids to the weary night?
Dost thou desire my slumbers should be broken,
While shadows like to thee do mock my sight?
Is it thy spirit that thou send'st from thee
So far from home into my deeds to pry,
To find out shames and idle hours in me,
The scope and tenor of thy jealousy?
O, no! thy love, though much, is not so great:
It is my love that keeps mine eye awake:
Mine own true love that doth my rest defeat,
To play the watchman ever for thy sake:
For thee watch I, whilst thou dost wake elsewhere,
From me far off, with others all too near.
 

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Shakespeare's sonnets. The text LI - C.

Posted on March 19, 2005 03:55 PM by Love P72.
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March 14, 2005

When I Consider Everything That Grows

Sonnet XV, When I Consider Everything That Grows, by William Shakespeare
When I consider everything that grows
Holds in perfection but a little moment,
That this huge stage presenteth nought but shows
Whereon the stars in secret influence comment;
When I perceive that men as plants increase,
Cheered and check'd even by the selfsame sky,
Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease,
And wear their brave state out of memory;
Then the conceit of this inconstant stay
Sets you most rich in youth before my sight,
Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay
To change your day of youth to sullied night;
And all in war with Time for love of you,
As he takes from you, I engraft you new.
 

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RPO -- William Shakespeare : Sonnet XV: When I Consider everything that Grows

Posted on March 14, 2005 03:15 PM by Love P72.
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March 13, 2005

My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun

My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun, by William Shakespeare
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red:
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go:
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
 

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RPO -- William Shakespeare : Sonnet CXXX: My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing like the Sun

Posted on March 13, 2005 06:07 PM by Love P72.
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March 10, 2005

To ---------

To ---------, by James D. Corrothers.
Beyond the hilltops to the north and west.
   Beyond the dells, and past the pleasant streams.
   Beyond the lakes that murmur in their dreams
The liquid fancies of their silver rest---
In such sweet thoughts as haunt a poet's breast---
   (For lakes are poets, Love) there dwells my theme's
   Sweet idol, you, Beloved, O Love, it seems
That of all women you are first and best!
   I love you deeply, and my soul would prove
Its passion, Dearest, on this page for you.
What shall I say?---O Love, believe me true!
   Ask lake and hilltop if they know my song:
      Ask stream and dell, and airs that bear along
         My soul's blown odors, if they know my love.
 

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LionHeart, Full Text

Posted on March 10, 2005 10:28 AM by Love P72.
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March 09, 2005

Tragic Love

This from abusedangel:
i had a dream, it seemed so real
you shot me in my heart, i got back up
but i realized now, that it's true
you shot me so deep, the bullet remains
i'm still living with it there, bleeding
i'm bleeding inside, still, day after day
living with the bullet that you shot in me
barely standing, barely living, bleeding
but that wound is not the only one
i have more left, each with a different gun
different people shoot me, and yet i stand
bearing all the bullets that are put in me
but the worst part isn't them there, bleeding
the worst part is, i'm bleeding alone
 

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Posted on March 9, 2005 05:35 AM by Love P72.
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March 07, 2005

Sonnet #73

Sonnet #73, by William Shakespeare
    That time of year thou mayst in me behold
    When yellow leaves, or none, or few do hang
    Upon those boughs which shake against the cold
    Bare ruined choirs where late the sweet birds sang.
    In me thou seest the twilight of such day
    As after sunset fadeth in the west,
    Which by and by black night doth steal away,
    Death's second self, which seals up all in rest.
    In me thou seest the glowing of such fire
    That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
    As the deathbed whereon it must expire,
    Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
    This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong,
    To love that well which thou must leave ere long.
 

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Shakespeare Sonnet #73

Posted on March 7, 2005 07:23 PM by Love P72.
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March 06, 2005

Love Sonnet III

Sonnet III, by Edmund Spenser
THe souerayne beauty which I doo admyre,
witnesse the world how worthy to be prayzed:
the light wherof hath kindled heauenly iyre,
in my fraile spirit by her from basenesse raysed.
That being now with her huge brightnesse dazed,
base thing I can no more endure to view:
but looking still on her I stand amazed,
at wondrous sight of so celestiall hew.
So when my toung would speak her praises dew,
it stopped is with thoughts astonishment:
and when my pen would write her titles true,
it rauisht is with fancies wonderment:
Yet in my hart I then both speake and write,
the wonder that my wit cannot endite.
 

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Love-Poems-Love-Poems.Com - Edmund Spenser - Sonnet III

Posted on March 6, 2005 06:57 PM by Love P72.
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February 25, 2005

Sonnet #3

Sonnet #3, by William Shakespeare

Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest,
Now is the time that face should form another,
Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest,
Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother.
For where is she so fair whose uneared womb
Disdains the tillage of thy husbandry?
Or who is he so fond will be the tomb,
Of his self-love to stop posterity?
Thou art thy mother's glass and she in thee
Calls back the lovely April of her prime,
So thou through windows of thine age shalt see,
Despite of wrinkles this thy golden time.
But if thou live remembered not to be,
Die single and thine image dies with thee.
 

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William Shakespeare - The Sonnets Page 03

Posted on February 25, 2005 07:01 PM by Love P72.
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Sonnet

Sonnet, by Robert Southey

With wayworn feet a Pilgrim woe-begone
  Life's upward road I journeyed many a day,
  And hymning many a sad yet soothing lay
Beguil'd my wandering with the charms of song.
  Lonely my heart and rugged was my way,
Yet often pluck'd I as I past along
  The wild and simple flowers of Poesy,
And as beseem'd the wayward Fancy's child
  Entwin'd each random weed that pleas'd mine eye.
Accept the wreath, BELOVED! it is wild
  And rudely garlanded; yet scorn not thou
The humble offering, where the sad rue weaves
'Mid gayer flowers its intermingled leaves,
  And I have twin'd the myrtle for thy brow.
 

Posted on February 25, 2005 06:57 PM by Love P72.
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February 22, 2005

Economist Rewrites Shakespeare

Heart

From the Economist, in response to an article on love science:

Shall I compare thee to a prairie vole?
Thou art more faithful and monogamous.
Rough winds may blast thee, stress may take its toll
And botox leave thy brow impervious;
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines
And oft thy sun-cream UV rays lets through;
And every perfect pout at last declines
Into a wrinkled spouse's sulking moue.
But our strong love shall not its power lose
While opioids keep us on the straight and narrow
While oxytocin does its magic prove
And vasopressin binds us one to other.
   So long as men can keep their hormones potent
   They'll be romantic as that model rodent.
 

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Economist.com | A St Valentine

Posted on February 22, 2005 12:39 PM by Love P72.
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Shall I Compare Thee to a Summers Day

Shall I Compare Thee to a Summers Day, by William Shakespeare, one of the most famous love poems.

Shall I compare thee to a Summers day?
Thou art more louely and more temperate:
Rough windes do shake the darling buds of Maie,
And Sommers lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heauen shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd,
And euery faire from faire some-time declines,
By chance, or natures changing course vntrim'd:
But thy eternall Sommer shall not fade,
Nor loose possession of that faire thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wandr'st in his shade,
When in eternall lines to time thou grow'st,
   So long as men can breath or eyes can see,
   So long liues this, and this giues life to thee,
 

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LionHeart, Full Text

Posted on February 22, 2005 10:54 AM by Love P72.
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